Toolbar Toolbar
Bristol Good Food Diaries

Bristol Good Food Diaries

The Good Food Diaries are your chance to show off what you're doing towards making Bristol a truly sustainable food city. Tell us your diary challenge within your online profile - this could be anything from sowing a few veg seeds to going on an urban forage, from making your first visit to one of Bristol's City Farms to signing-up as a volunteer on a community growing project, from going supermarket-free for a week to only shopping in Bristol Pounds - and then share the experience of your challenge through your online diary. Follow the progress of other members of the Good Food Diary group. Share your tips and ideas. Get inspired by Bristol's Good Food stories!


  • RosieMc
  • Claire Ladkin
  • TracyK
  • Bonnie
  • Amanda Bayliss
  • zoegrace
  • JossyBossy
  • Kerry McCarthy MP
  • JudyG
  • LyndseyKnight
  • Jen & Julia
  • KristinS
  • JaneS
  • SaranDavies
  • Katie Lauren Taylor
  • Lucy H
  • Daniella
  • Lizzie Thal-Jantzen
  • Sianmryan
  • Sugar Free Sweet Pea
  • Just Another Mummy
  • Gingey Bites
Become Member

10 May 2014

The challenge of leftovers - bread and tomato soup?

A recent e-mail from Foodcycle, a National campaign to limit food waste, has requested recipes for a cookbook to be sold to raise money for charity (image 1). Below is my contribution that I discovered recently as a means of using leftover hard cheese rind (always seems such a waste!), although this isn't strictly vegetarian as requested I tweaked it a little and left the cheese as optional. Bread and tomato soup: From the Tuscany area of Italy this is a great recipe for using up a few leftovers such as old stale loaf bread, fresh or tinned tomatoes, cut herbs, and even hard cheese rind. Though it is an hour cooking time you can walk away from the pot for large chunks of time while the smell fills your kitchen! Preparation time: 15 minutes Cooking time: 1 hour Serves: 4 Ingredients: 400 g of ripe tomatoes (peeled, de-seeded, and coarsely chopped; or roughly 1 tin of tomatoes) 1 celery stick (chopped; or substitute with 1 small white onion, chopped) 1 garlic clove (chopped) 1 tablespoon olive oil Salt and pepper 2 slices of stale bread (cut into small cubes including the crusts; although not sliced white packaged bread!) A handful of basil leaves, or alternatively flat leaf parsley or coriander (torn, at end of cooking) Recipe: Add the tomatoes, celery stick, garlic, olive oil and 1.2 liters of water to a pan with a pinch of salt and pepper and bring to the boil. Reduce the heat and simmer with no lid for around 30 minutes (adding leftover hard cheese rind here if using), then add the bread and simmer over an even lower heat for 30 more minutes with no lid. Note that at this point you essentially have a tomato soup you could just go ahead and eat, but it's also a useful way to use up bread. Taste and season to your liking then serve in warmed soup bowls topped with the punchy herbs, tear these by hand at the last moment so that the oils aren't lost on the knife blade. Notes: To easily peel whole tomatoes gently score a knife across the bottom and top in a criss-cross fashion and place in boiling water for 20 seconds, wait for them to cool then peel away the skin. You can add leftover hard cheese rind at the simmering stage to add flavour (e.g. parmesan or pecorino, buy vegetarian or only use rennet-based cheese for non-vegetarians).

Comment (0)

9 May 2014

Digging for victory

Admittedly there is nothing more in the war-time theme here other than the title - except perhaps for the fact that gardening was something my grandfather did during the war and passed on to my father who passed it onto me. I will be forever grateful of growing up in a home where having flowers to admire was equaled by having vegetables to enjoy all year around. Since moving to Bristol I have tried my hardest to maintain a kitchen garden, and fortunately given the space I have out back I have previously had a glass greenhouse and now several smaller polythene houses and tubs. When I first moved here I was delighted to find that the city was ostensibly a good place to think about growing your own food and buying locally grown and produced food (see image 4). I got on board and have been eating my own vegetables and herbs ever since including potatoes, carrots, mangetout, tomatoes, cucumbers (image 3), spring onions, radish, lettuce, courgette, turnips, as well as basil (green and purple), mint (English [image 1], spear, and chocolate), sage (green and pineapple), oregano (green and variegated), coriander, fennel, dill, Vietnamese coriander, lemon balm, parsley, and rosemary. While shopping at a well-known supermarket I noticed that a polythene wrapped back of herbs was 90p for around 30g. An entire plant was £1.50 – I sprung for the whole plant, with a view to planting it somewhere in our herb patch. However, by this logic my entire garden will be a herb patch by the end of the summer, so how can I prioritise? What herbs are most useful or practical to grow? Although I enjoy gardening I tend to attack the job in much the same way as my cooking, read the instructions, and then just have a go. Either it works, or it doesn't. Admittedly, I won't be running a farm (well) anytime soon, but it tends to work fairly well for me, but herbs? The bane of my life! Some I plant one year and the seeds never emerge from the soil, the next year I plant up the same thing and it grows and spreads ferociously (c.f. this years bountiful coriander, image 2). In the end I've resolved to plant herbs where I can without worrying too much about, while keeping in mind those that are a little more sensitive. If there's any advice I can give (and take myself) moving forward: mint should always have it's own pot (like potatoes it dominates and strangles other plants); and basil emphatically does not grow as well on this continent as it does in the Americas, don't put it outside, definitely don't put it outside before July, in fact probably keep it inside and nurse it like a child. Images: 1 - Preparation for mint julep cocktails, and perhaps more importantly, mint julep cupcakes 2 - Still trialing macarons, these from Stokes Croft with the soft green backdrop of our herb patch behind 3 - Cucumber seedling, grown from seed with a propagation table and hardening off in the greenhouse 4 - Bristol Food Connections talk at the Canteen, Local Food: Pollyanna or panacea?

Comment (0)

8 May 2014

May Bank holiday

Then into Monday and, although not an official part of the Bristol food connections, however Redland May Fair offered yet more opportunity to try out lovely produce from talented local producers with @mullioncove making another appearance and @veedoublemoo providing a delicious and well needed ice cream sundae. The allergy meant none of Mullion Coves pasties for me but then, I'd have had to have been quick if I could eat them as they were so popular they sold out before the fair had even officially opened!! Double order next year please! After 12 hours on the Green home but happy after a stunning Bristol weekend which has convinced me that this is the city I want to call home!

Comment (0)

8 May 2014

May Day continued

@bishopstonsupperclub on Sat night where the talented Danielle is more than willing to cater for my allergy and without giving me anything that looks or smells significantly less divine that what everyone is having - hurrah! Four courses of amazing food with great company saw Sat night finished off in style. The less said about the trip to a random and pretty ropey bar in Cotham, the better! Home to bed at 2.30 happy and certainly not hungry! Sunday, not surprisingly, saw a rather more gentile start to the day who a wander down to Park Street to see 'Park and Slide.' In fact, all I could see from the top of Park street was the sea of humanity all the way down Park street and the massive throng on College Green - what a difference a day makes! Another wander round the Ark marquee and the marquees at Millennium Square provided me with some lovely sweet fresh English asparagus as well as a couple of different cheeses from local producers and some stunning looking lamb from a rare breed beastie with those pretty impressive horns! Can't wait to get time to cook and enjoy them (although quite a bit of the asparagus hasn't survived long enough to cook - so sweet that eating it raw is also a delight!)

Comment (0)

1 May 2014

Ship-shape and Bristol foodie

After much deliberation - my challenge? To increase my food efficiency! Over the next few weeks I want to try and streamline my shopping and cooking experience by limiting waste, expense, and food miles, as well as increasing the nutritional efficiency of each meal. Being conveniently located in Bristol - a city that prides itself on local food supply, food recycling, and city farming - I'm sure this won't be too difficult, but I'm anticipating an interesting and informative journey. I keep a blog ( in any case that keeps track of good recipes that I find or tweak myself, and photographs that help me keep track of what I'm eating. Mostly my job involves science outreach and talking about the brain, so writing about food consistently will be a brand new experience and I'm very much looking forward to it. Over the next while I hope to write about our brand new garden compost heap and how we limit food waste before it simply gets thrown away, our vegetable and kitchen herb growing, home-brewing including where our hops come from and where our grain waste goes, how you can increase the nutritional value of your food and why this is a good idea, where to buy locally supplied foods and whether this is a consistently viable option, as well as the practicality of making your own version of shop-bought foods like bread and pasta...but for my first post? Well, macarons of course!

Comment (0)