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Bristol Good Food Diaries

Bristol Good Food Diaries

The Good Food Diaries are your chance to show off what you're doing towards making Bristol a truly sustainable food city. Tell us your diary challenge within your online profile - this could be anything from sowing a few veg seeds to going on an urban forage, from making your first visit to one of Bristol's City Farms to signing-up as a volunteer on a community growing project, from going supermarket-free for a week to only shopping in Bristol Pounds - and then share the experience of your challenge through your online diary. Follow the progress of other members of the Good Food Diary group. Share your tips and ideas. Get inspired by Bristol's Good Food stories!

Members

  • RosieMc
  • Claire Ladkin
  • TracyK
  • Bonnie
  • Amanda Bayliss
  • zoegrace
  • JossyBossy
  • Kerry McCarthy MP
  • JudyG
  • LyndseyKnight
  • Jen & Julia
  • KristinS
  • JaneS
  • SaranDavies
  • Katie Lauren Taylor
  • Lucy H
  • Daniella
  • Lizzie Thal-Jantzen
  • Sianmryan
  • Sugar Free Sweet Pea
  • Just Another Mummy
  • Gingey Bites
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12 May 2014

Final day!

OK, so I decided to end on a high note! This is a picture of the absolutely delicious meal that I had on Friday at the Folk House, which has the most wonderful locally sourced and reasonably priced food, and where it is as easy as pie to pay with the Bristol Pound. I didn't think I would be able to top that, so I ended my challenge there a bit early. To sum up, it was more difficult to carry out my challenge than I expected. But I am going to carry on next year, and during that time I hope to help get more cafes, more market stalls at food festivals, more butchers, more late night eateries, more independent businesses and more buying groups around the city to discover the benefits of strengthening Bristol's growing local economy. Bring on 2015!

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10 May 2014

Day 10: The Last Supper

I woke up today knowing that this would be the last day of the challenge which made me sad. No more gorgeous local food and back to the basic student diet which mainly consists of pasta and pesto… But who can complain? Nothing smells as good as a bowl of pasta topped with pesto and cheese. Yea, I am not believing my own words here either! I am going to miss the incredible pieces of great quality meat that I got from Ruby and White and not to mention the various wholesome ingredients from the two shops: Wild Oats and The Better Food Company. One thing that will stay though is the veg box – that has been a cheeky order since January and doing this challenge has made me see how much more I should value it! Breakfast today was a mango that I bought from The Cambridge Farmer’s Outlet and it was only 50p! Amazing. The guy from the shop told me how he buys them in bulk as supermarket rejects and that if he didn’t buy them then they would either go to waste or be fed to livestock. Crazy to think that supermarkets can reject orders based on sales and demand. Makes it seem so much more important to cut the middle man out and buy directly from these farm shops and markets. And the mango was also juicy and delicious! Only 50p! Lunch was a little experiment with a combination of baked beans and kidney beans on toast. It was actually very tasty and a nice addition to your average tin of baked beans. Everything in this meal was organic and came from The Cambridge Farmer’s Outlet. Now I’ve never been too bothered whether my food is organic or not but since doing this challenge I’ve found that I feel better within myself, less hungry and better than anything I’ve lost a little bit of weight. I think that eating food which is less processed has really helped – I’m not even sure if my supermarket bran flakes are all that healthy! Processing food adds unnecessary sugar and salt when you can have a nice bowl of porridge and monitor your intake levels in a much more effective way. And to be honest, I’d prefer to eat a bowl of porridge with a sprinkling of sugar every morning; especially if it could help my bikini body on its way! Now you can never finish a challenge without going out with a bang! I can assure you that I well and truly topped this fun 10 days with an awesome meal. It could only be the one and only British favourite that is steak and chips! Oh my this was the best meal of the week and all homemade to boot. Again, every ingredient came from the same independent shop in Cambridge and this included steak, potatoes, onions, mushrooms and cream. I made this for my boyfriend and myself and I think it is safe to say that he enjoyed it too because he cleared everything on his plate! This may not sound like much but when you see the portion difference between his plate and mine then you may start to understand. So with the last meal of the challenge eaten and described it has to be the end of the Bristol Good Food Challenge blog… BUT don’t despair because I will be back! I am going to do another food related challenge so suggestions are very welcome although I do already have a few ideas in mind – they’re my secret though so stay tuned. I will be back after exams are over and I have a 4 month summer to write many more things on food related topics. Watch this space!

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10 May 2014

Vegan Day 4 (last one)

I realise I have gone pretty wrong with breakfasts. I met Kerry McCarthy at the raising of the European Flag ceremony today, who suggested that oat milk is not the best to try and almond or another milk would have been better, so I'll get some next time to try next time I'm in Scoopaway. Grapefruit and toast has been pretty good anyway. Lunch in the Folk House, paid for with £B my favourite currency, it was a mixed bean salad. I felt a bit hungry after first finishing it, and also being reminded to leave the butter off my bread (I really like the taste of butter.......) A celebratory night out (I don't really eat out this much normally) on Friday with Persian food from Kookoo, recently moved up to Filton Avenue. Delicious dips and then an Aubergine dish with amazing herb rice. (pictured). Summary of Vegan days: I have really enjoyed it, and feel pretty good on a nearly wholly-non animal diet (oh those mini-eggs and the odd cup of tea with a drop of milk). Tomorrow I am being sent out for pain-au-chocolats for birthday treats so I am not even going to attempt to continue. I will increase the number days I eat vegannly. So, thanks to Bristol Food Connections for stimulating me to change the way I eat.....

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10 May 2014

Vegan Day 3

Good day of good food. I met an old friend for lunch and had a tasty butternut squash, pumpkin seed and chickpea salad with a delicious lapsang tea. Dinner was our regular store-cupboard favourite: kidney bean curry. (You can make it half an hour and one tin of kidney beans and one of chopped tomatoes serves 2). Also had an unusual evening talking to a WI group in Gloucestershire - apparently they've never had a debate before.......

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10 May 2014

Local market

Todays breakfast was honey on toast, from the local Bristol market! lovely fresh honey from local British bees!

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10 May 2014

The challenge of leftovers - bread and tomato soup?

A recent e-mail from Foodcycle, a National campaign to limit food waste, has requested recipes for a cookbook to be sold to raise money for charity (image 1). Below is my contribution that I discovered recently as a means of using leftover hard cheese rind (always seems such a waste!), although this isn't strictly vegetarian as requested I tweaked it a little and left the cheese as optional. Bread and tomato soup: From the Tuscany area of Italy this is a great recipe for using up a few leftovers such as old stale loaf bread, fresh or tinned tomatoes, cut herbs, and even hard cheese rind. Though it is an hour cooking time you can walk away from the pot for large chunks of time while the smell fills your kitchen! Preparation time: 15 minutes Cooking time: 1 hour Serves: 4 Ingredients: 400 g of ripe tomatoes (peeled, de-seeded, and coarsely chopped; or roughly 1 tin of tomatoes) 1 celery stick (chopped; or substitute with 1 small white onion, chopped) 1 garlic clove (chopped) 1 tablespoon olive oil Salt and pepper 2 slices of stale bread (cut into small cubes including the crusts; although not sliced white packaged bread!) A handful of basil leaves, or alternatively flat leaf parsley or coriander (torn, at end of cooking) Recipe: Add the tomatoes, celery stick, garlic, olive oil and 1.2 liters of water to a pan with a pinch of salt and pepper and bring to the boil. Reduce the heat and simmer with no lid for around 30 minutes (adding leftover hard cheese rind here if using), then add the bread and simmer over an even lower heat for 30 more minutes with no lid. Note that at this point you essentially have a tomato soup you could just go ahead and eat, but it's also a useful way to use up bread. Taste and season to your liking then serve in warmed soup bowls topped with the punchy herbs, tear these by hand at the last moment so that the oils aren't lost on the knife blade. Notes: To easily peel whole tomatoes gently score a knife across the bottom and top in a criss-cross fashion and place in boiling water for 20 seconds, wait for them to cool then peel away the skin. You can add leftover hard cheese rind at the simmering stage to add flavour (e.g. parmesan or pecorino, buy vegetarian or only use rennet-based cheese for non-vegetarians).

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9 May 2014

Day 9: Only One Day Left!

I woke up again today with that annoying question: to go to my lecture or not to go to my lecture? But because this lecture in particular happened to be the last one of first year, I felt an irresistible urge to go. I decided to go back to basics for my breakfast this morning and went with a trusty bowl of porridge. I did however go with my walnut addition which was also very tasty. This was yet another locally sourced meal; the oats, sugar and walnuts came from the shop Wild Oats and the milk came from The Better Food Company. It's always nice knowing that the food came from a sustainable source and I also think it tastes better too! I am blogging from Cambridge tonight as I am visiting my boyfriend in university. I had to make a meal for the train so decided to make a cheeky bacon sandwich because the one I had the other night was sooooo good! Again, everything that made up the meal was sourced very locally - and my favourite butchers delivered yet another great couple of slices of bacon. And who can deny that a bacon sandwich is tasty? Always a good choice. With a three and a half hour journey done, I had to source some local food from an independent shop in Cambridge. What felt like an impossible task at the time (it was 17.30 and shops were about to close!), I managed to find an Aladdin's Cave of amazing food! This shop was called The Cambridge Farmer's Outlet and they supply a wide range of fruit and veg, local farmer's meat and dairy produce, dried and tinned organic foods and much much more! Amazed, I was walking round this great independent shop for 20 minutes just picking out all the great looking food and I think I got enough for the next few days even though my challenge is ending tomorrow... But who can resist some amazing looking organic food?? Especially when it's reasonably priced too! Tonight's supper was a nice and simple 'bangers and mash'. I do love my leeks so I added some fried leeks in with the onions to add another dimension to the dish. The leek was much bigger than I thought and it ended up being more like leeks with a bit of mash and sausage. Oopsies. This was another really tasty meal and even though I was on a time and money budget to source it, I managed to find the perfect shop. I think if I lived in Cambridge then I would seldom shop anywhere else. P.S. Sorry about the lack of breakfast and lunch pictures! My phone won't connect to the internet so I can't upload them - these photos were luckily taken on my boyfriend's phone.

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9 May 2014

Digging for victory

Admittedly there is nothing more in the war-time theme here other than the title - except perhaps for the fact that gardening was something my grandfather did during the war and passed on to my father who passed it onto me. I will be forever grateful of growing up in a home where having flowers to admire was equaled by having vegetables to enjoy all year around. Since moving to Bristol I have tried my hardest to maintain a kitchen garden, and fortunately given the space I have out back I have previously had a glass greenhouse and now several smaller polythene houses and tubs. When I first moved here I was delighted to find that the city was ostensibly a good place to think about growing your own food and buying locally grown and produced food (see image 4). I got on board and have been eating my own vegetables and herbs ever since including potatoes, carrots, mangetout, tomatoes, cucumbers (image 3), spring onions, radish, lettuce, courgette, turnips, as well as basil (green and purple), mint (English [image 1], spear, and chocolate), sage (green and pineapple), oregano (green and variegated), coriander, fennel, dill, Vietnamese coriander, lemon balm, parsley, and rosemary. While shopping at a well-known supermarket I noticed that a polythene wrapped back of herbs was 90p for around 30g. An entire plant was £1.50 – I sprung for the whole plant, with a view to planting it somewhere in our herb patch. However, by this logic my entire garden will be a herb patch by the end of the summer, so how can I prioritise? What herbs are most useful or practical to grow? Although I enjoy gardening I tend to attack the job in much the same way as my cooking, read the instructions, and then just have a go. Either it works, or it doesn't. Admittedly, I won't be running a farm (well) anytime soon, but it tends to work fairly well for me, but herbs? The bane of my life! Some I plant one year and the seeds never emerge from the soil, the next year I plant up the same thing and it grows and spreads ferociously (c.f. this years bountiful coriander, image 2). In the end I've resolved to plant herbs where I can without worrying too much about, while keeping in mind those that are a little more sensitive. If there's any advice I can give (and take myself) moving forward: mint should always have it's own pot (like potatoes it dominates and strangles other plants); and basil emphatically does not grow as well on this continent as it does in the Americas, don't put it outside, definitely don't put it outside before July, in fact probably keep it inside and nurse it like a child. Images: 1 - Preparation for mint julep cocktails, and perhaps more importantly, mint julep cupcakes 2 - Still trialing macarons, these from Stokes Croft with the soft green backdrop of our herb patch behind 3 - Cucumber seedling, grown from seed with a propagation table and hardening off in the greenhouse 4 - Bristol Food Connections talk at the Canteen, Local Food: Pollyanna or panacea?

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9 May 2014

Not done so well today!

Yesterday's bread making was not a complete success! The rolls did not rise and were not really edible. The loaf was better but several comments made along lines of ' is that the only bread we have in the house'? I have gone to Joe's today and stocked up on our usual loaves!! Hopefully I can persuade the rest of the family to finish my handcrafted loaf first! Or it may be made into croutons for some soup which I am making for friends this pm! Would be good if I could find a use for the rolls.... The recording of 'The Kitchen Cabinet' was really enjoyable. Jay Rayner was a great host and the panel laid back and fun! I had never listened to it before but will now fit it into my Radio Four fix! Sharpham Farm talked about their spelt flour, which I am tempted to try but not before I have worked my way through my growing cupboard of different flours! I didn't manage to save money today, due to walking past some of my favourite Glos Rd shops.. Licata and the Vietnamese supermarket. I could not resist buying a few things. I need stronger will power to keep my food spending under control!

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9 May 2014

Food Connections Markets

I have now had to expand my ‘shopping locally’ challenge to include the markets of the Food Connections Festival. I had a lovely weekend over the bank holiday – it was my Grandma’s 90th birthday, and I made her some lemon curd (with lemons, butter, eggs all bought on Gloucester Road, of course). Then my family and I spent a very enjoyable day wandering around the Food Connections tents in the city centre. I spent an inordinately long amount of time in the produce markets, including having a very lengthy conversation with the woman selling a range of unusual flour. I ended up buying some ‘Emmer’ flour, made from an ancient ancestor of wheat. God knows what I’m going to do with it, but she seemed to think it was the next big thing. At the harbourside produce market I bought these lovely tomatoes. Presented with pride by the stall trader, they were so ridiculously bright and juicy-looking that I couldn’t resist. I find tomatoes that are this good don’t need much else with them. I mixed them with some spring onions and pine nuts, and drizzled the lot liberally with olive oil (that I already had in stock, does that count?!). That’s what I love about produce markets, you can discover new ingredients that you wouldn’t otherwise. Being able to talk to the person producing them makes the whole experience much more personal, and infinitely more enjoyable than just picking something off a supermarket shelf.

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